Hi all,

I know I’ve been quiet for the past year, but I do have a lot of announcements!

Alex Mang Speaks At #MSIgnite

If you’ve been watching my social media feed lately, you probably know by now that I’m a featured speaker at #MSIgnite, which is absolutely awesome.

On top of that, I will also get engaged as a Community Reporter which gives me a chance to interview a lot of awesome people, including Mark Russinovich, Scott Hanselman, Brendan Burns, Donovan Brown, Jeff Hollan, James Montemagno, Eduardo Laureano, and many more…!

As a featured speaker, I get the wonderful chance to talk about DevOps, serverless and microservices.

Can’t make it to Orlando? You can still watch my #MSIgnite session live on cloud-native applications on Wednesday, September 26 at 11:55 AM. Check here for details:
https://myignite.techcommunity.microsoft.com/sessions/66357?ocid=AID725708_QSG_SCL_273800.

Additionally, my #MSIgnite on serverless applications will be live as well on Thursday, September 27 at 12:45 PM (https://myignite.techcommunity.microsoft.com/sessions/66463?ocid=AID725708_QSG_SCL_273800), as will my #MSIgnite session live on DevOps on Thursday, September 27 at 2:50 PM. Check here for details:
https://myignite.techcommunity.microsoft.com/sessions/66356?ocid=AID725708_QSG_SCL_273800.

See you there, champs!

Join me tomorrow for my Microsoft Ignite session Azure Hold’em DevOps (THR3054) at 13:15 in the OCCC South – Expo Theater #1 (that’s right next to the Microsoft Showcase area and the Expo hall) where I will share five stories on DevOps pains which we encountered whilst working with various customers with offices all across Europe. It will be a blitz-session since it’s full of good information and delivered in only 20 minutes (panic mode ON :-o). Also make sure you add the session to your Session Scheduler and add a reminder to your agenda.

Microsoft Ignite Speaker badge

Additionally, I’m happy to announce that during tomorrow’s Ignite keynote I will be seated in the VIP section and, just because of that, I decided to report live the best Azure announcements – so it will be a curated list based on my personal opinions and own thoughts. If you’re interested, make sure you follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn, where I will post all of these.

See you at Microsoft Ignite!

 

Microsoft Ignite sessions

 

The entire DevOps story with the Microsoft Stack is expanding its reach to more and more services and with an ever-growing set of advanced features. During this article, I will cover the benefits and ways to configure Service Endpoints within either Visual Studio Team Services and Team Foundation Service, in order to create a highly coupled ALM story for your apps.

What are Service Endpoints?

Back in the days of Team Foundation Services (2013 and prior to that), everyone was asking for a way to make Release Management expand to other project types rather than .NET and VB/C++. Taken this feedback (along with many other requests) Microsoft rewrote Team Build. Personally, I believe the entire DevOps story using the Microsoft Stack has become more mature than ever and ready to solve the most complex requirements your application has. In order to achieve this type of extensibility, Team Build allows one to add features in two ways: (1) by installing extensions which can either be wrote and uploaded by yourself or by installed from the Visual Studio Marketplace or by (2) taking advantage of the TFX Command Line Interface which allows you to add custom designed tasks. The latter is especially useful when it comes to creating a single-task functionality as an atomic process part of the build or release definition, rather than leverage several tasks individually. This ensures that in the situation of build and release processes which have to do the same tasks over and over again a few times are easily configurable and thus reduces the error-prone nature of a highly-configurable workflow system, such as Team Build.

The beauty of these tasks are that they are not exclusively designed to Microsoft-specific products and services – in fact, most of the tasks which have to deal with external services will specify the external service’s endpoint in the form of a connection setting which is team-project wide. Again, this helps prevent errors related to connection strings and such.

These connection settings are known as Service Endpoints and can be configured from the Settings pane of any team project, both in Visual Studio Team Services and Team Foundation Services, under the Services tab.

Visual Studio Service Endpoints

Read More →

If you’ve ever received support from the Microsoft Azure Support team on Hosted Services/Cloud Services, you might want to know that the great team that supported you (which, by the way, in order to offer 24/7 support is deployed around the world!) has used a tool which allows them (and since last year, you too) to debug slow performance, hangs, manipulate HTTP traffic, analyze network performance, transfer files, recall a debugged machine from the load balancer, check the defined inputs on your service’s roles and so on.

Please be advised that this is actually an in-house tool developed by Microsoft and is arguably, the most handy tool to have whenever something works unexpected in your cloud environment.

The link to it is here, and this blogpost explains all the features in a little more detail.

Hope you’ll find it useful at some point.